Posts Tagged ‘ india ’

September Birthstone – Sapphire Information

April 17, 2012
September Birthstone – Sapphire Information

The sapphire has a colorful, storied history unlike any other gem. A symbol of faith, nobility and truth, and long believed to have healing and protective powers, the sapphire’s dark blue hue has been coveted for thousands of years. Designated as September’s birthstone since the early 1900s, the sapphire brings depth and grace to the first month of autumn. The sapphire has been one of the biggest luxury jewelry trends ever since Kate Middleton began wearing Princess Diana’s sapphire and diamond engagement ring last fall. And with fashion icons such as Victoria Beckham and Beyoncé Knowles wearing sapphire jewelry both on and off the Red Carpet, the deep blue gem has never been more vogue. September is months away, but given the sapphire’s recent surge in popularity, now is the perfect time to invest in a piece of sapphire jewelry — especially a classic sapphire ring . Diamond & Estate Trust is especially smitten with this 10.16 carat Burma no-heat sapphire ring . At 10.16 carats, this certified no-heat Burma sapphire is one of the largest we’ve ever seen. Couple that magnificent size with two shield-cut diamonds and a classic setting, and you have a ring with unmistakable luxury and vibrancy. For an Art Deco take on the sapphire, we offer two vintage diamond and sapphire platinum Art Deco bracelets. The first, a 1950s French Art Deco bracelet , features a sleek setting and 10 carats each of white diamonds and blue sapphires. The second bracelet features a chic link design accented by 9 carats of diamonds and 2 carats of sapphires. The extremely rare Kashmir sapphire has been the most celebrated, valuable and coveted sapphire variety since the first Kashmir sapphire was discovered in India in the 1870s. Considering the world’s love affair with the Kashmir sapphire, we consider this spectacular Kashmir sapphire the prize of our luxury gem collection . At between 7 and 9 carats of luxurious, deep cornflower blue, this Kashmir sapphire in a highly-coveted cushion cut is a gem hunter’s dream. The facets in its classic cushion cut shine from every angle. For the ultimate symbol of luxury, look no further: Few gems in the world match the caliber of this Kashmir sapphire . Let Diamond & Estate Trust help you find the perfect loose sapphire or piece of vintage sapphire jewelry for your style. With a luxury collection filled with hand-picked estate jewelry , signed designer pieces, custom pieces , luxury watches (Rolex, Audemars, Patek Philippe) and rare Art Deco jewelry, our experts provide unparalleled pieces for an elite international clientele . Link: September Birthstone – Sapphire Information

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Blue Diamond Guide – Celebrity Jewelry Trend 2012

April 10, 2012
Blue Diamond Guide – Celebrity Jewelry Trend 2012

In honor of the spring season, Diamond & Estate Trust is devoting this week to the colored diamond , spring 2012’s most vibrant jewelry trend. Up today is the blue diamond, one of the rarest colored diamonds around. Although blue diamonds have always been celebrated by the world’s nobility (think the Hope Diamond’s cursed royal legacy), celebrities such as Jay-Z and Halle Berry have catapulted the blue diamond back into the fashion spotlight. Here’s a quick guide on the blue diamond. The Wittelsbach-Graff Diamond How rare are blue diamonds? Only one in 10,000 mined diamonds is a color other than white. Within the spectrum of colored diamonds , the blue diamond is one of the rarest: only red and purple diamonds are more extraordinary than the blue diamond . The blue diamond may not be as rare as the red diamond, but these gorgeous blue gems are seldom discovered. Less than .1 percent of all diamonds mined have an intense fancy blue color . That may explain why blue diamonds command sky-high auction prices on the rare occasion when they do become available for public purchase. How do blue diamonds get their color? A white diamond takes on a deep blue hue when there’s a surplus of boron available during its formation below the Earth’s surface. The more boron found within a diamond’s carbon molecules, the more intense the diamond’s blue color becomes. When you’re determining the worth of a blue diamond, it’s safe to assume that the richest hue commands the largest price. Blue diamonds range from a deep, steely shade like the one found in the legendary Hope Diamond to a pale, subtle blue. Blue-green or blue-purple shades are less valuable than true, rich blue hued diamonds. When it comes to color , remember that naturally enhanced (heat treated) blue diamonds are far less valuable than blue diamonds with a natural color. Be sure to check a GIA certification to make sure the blue diamond you’re considering hasn’t been artificially treated to achieve its color. What are some famous blue diamonds? The Hope Diamond The 45.52 carat Blue Hope Diamond is regarded as one of the world’s most breathtaking gems. Currently housed in the Smithsonian, this steel blue cushion antique brilliant cut diamond is one of the largest known fancy blue colored diamonds ever discovered. Another famous blue diamond, the Wittelsbach-Graff Diamond , from India, sold for $24.3 million at a Christie’s auction in 2008, setting a record at the time for the highest auction price of any diamond or gem. The cushion cut diamond’s deep grayish blue color, magnificent 35.56 carat size and legendary history make it one of the most iconic blue diamonds in the world. Other notable blue diamonds include the 70.21 carat Idol’s Eye, which has a striking shape that combines the Old Mine Cut and the triangular cut; the 189.62 carat Orlov Diamond; the 35.27 carat Sultan of Morocco; and the 42.92 carat Terschenko Diamond. What cut works best for a blue diamond? Like other colored diamonds, a blue diamond’s hue is most striking when cut into a radiant, princess or brilliant cut. That’s mainly because the facets of these fiery cuts bring out the depth and hue of a colored diamond. Still, some diamond cutters , such as the one responsible for the Wittelsbach-Graff Diamond , choose a softer cut like the cushion cut to emphasize a colored diamond’s luster. Which celebrities wear blue diamonds? Jay-Z and Beyonce may have gained fanfare lately for wearing sapphires to celebrate the birth of Blue Ivy , but it seems the musicians are now moving on to even bigger, more valuable blue gems. Jay-Z has reportedly been scouring the world’s best jewelry collections this week for the ultimate fourth wedding anniversary gift for Beyonce: a gorgeous blue diamond.  And Halle Berry famously wore a pear shaped blue and white diamond necklace on the Red Carpet a few years ago, garnering rave reviews from luxury jewelers worldwide. Blue diamonds and Diamond & Estate Trust When you’re ready for the ultimate symbol of exceptional luxury, there’s no better choice than the elegant and stunning blue diamond. Diamond & Estate Trust’s collection includes colored diamonds in every hue in the color spectrum. Our experts can turn any loose gem into a truly magnificent colored diamond custom piece . Diamond & Estate Trust is Southern California’s most trusted buyer and seller of diamonds, gems, vintage jewelry and luxury watches . For the ultimate vibrant statement piece, view  our exquisite collection of colored diamonds . Looking for more information on colored diamonds? Be sure to check out yesterday’s post on the yellow diamond, and visit our blog everyday this week for a profile on a different colored diamond . Follow this link: Blue Diamond Guide – Celebrity Jewelry Trend 2012

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Oprah Dedicated To Turning OWN Around

January 31, 2012

LOS ANGELES — Oprah Winfrey earned the rare opportunity to convert her media charisma into a monogramed TV channel. Now she’s the one tasked with rescuing OWN, the Oprah Winfrey Network, after a disappointing first year. It’s a high-stakes, potentially ego-shattering challenge that could make the strongest woman or man flinch. But win or lose, Winfrey says she relishes the fight to turn OWN’s fortunes around. “Yes, some mistakes were made. Who hasn’t made mistakes? The real beauty is you can say, `I learned from that,’” Winfrey said. “I don’t worry about failure. I worry about, `Did I do all I could do?’” The cable channel, which marks its first year Jan. 1, is trying for a fresh start after executive turnover and missteps that proved OWN lacked a solid foundation on which to build, this despite a Discovery Communications investment of a reported $250 million and counting. Viewers snubbed the lineup that skimped on programming and, surprisingly, what should have been OWN’s unique weapon of choice: Winfrey herself, whose limited on-air presence will be boosted Sunday with a new weekly series, “Oprah’s Next Chapter.” OWN has failed to improve on, or in some instances even match, the modest ratings and small audience earned by the low-profile Discovery Health channel it replaced. “I would absolutely say it is and was not where I want it to be for year one,” Winfrey said. “My focus up until (last) May was doing what I do best, which is `The Oprah Winfrey Show,’ and giving that my full attention” until its conclusion. But Winfrey, who said management team errors in planning and execution could serve as a cautionary tale (“I was never interested in writing a book. … THIS could be a book”), rejects the idea that a single year’s performance will determine OWN’s ultimate fate. Or hers. “Somebody was talking to me in that kind of saddened, `How are you?’ tone, and I was thinking, `I’m fine,’” said Winfrey, 57, who ruled as the queen of daytime TV until she ended her talk show after 25 years and turned her attention to the channel. “I realized the reason people have this tone is they’re reading all the press (about OWN), so you see me and wonder if I can still walk. … I am a determined and committed woman. I don’t give up. I’m just getting started,” she said in a recent interview. One bonus of being Oprah: She has received pep talks from other media movers and shakers. “Everybody has told me – Ted Turner has told me, Barry Diller has told me, Lorne Michaels has told me, David Geffen has told me – anybody who’s ever worked with a channel, who’s ever done anything, has said it takes three to five years,” she said, adding, “You have to do the work. … You do not have to pay attention to the criticism.” Year two for OWN will reflect executive changes made last July, when Winfrey expanded her role at the channel by adding the roles of chief executive and chief creative officer to her position as chairman. Discovery Communications COO Peter Liguori had filled in as interim head after OWN CEO Christina Norman was dismissed in the wake of poor ratings. Although the channel’s ownership is split evenly between Discovery and Winfrey’s Chicago-based production company, Harpo Inc., it is Discovery’s money that’s on the line. With more scheduling consistency, movies, original series with and without Winfrey, and “a lot more Oprah in general,” Discovery is “a lot more confident that we’re heading in the right direction,” said company spokesman David Leavy. Sheri Salata and Erik Logan, two veteran Harpo executives, were brought on board to share the title of OWN president, with Logan moving from Chicago to OWN’s Los Angeles headquarters. Logan said he clearly understands the hard work in establishing any cable channel, and this one in particular. “One of the greatest gifts and challenges is to have her name on the door,” Logan said of his top boss. “Everything you do garners a high level of scrutiny and attention. … We don’t run from that.” The initially slight programming lineup is being beefed up, most notably with “Oprah’s Next Chapter.” The weekly series debuts 9 p.m.-11 p.m. EST Sunday with Winfrey’s visit to the New Hampshire home of Steven Tyler. “Next Chapter” turns the once studio-bound Winfrey into a globe-trotting interviewer who drops into the home of a Hasidic Jewish family in New York, George Lucas’ Skywalker Ranch in California and cook Paula Deen’s Georgia estate. There is also a trip with Sean Penn to Haiti, fire-walking with Tony Robbins and a planned India trip with Deepak Chopra. The injection of Winfrey on-screen, not just in the executive suite, is sorely needed, suggested one industry analyst. “The biggest mistake they made is, if it’s the Oprah Winfrey Network, where’s Oprah?” said Bill Carroll of media buying firm Katz Media. He compared OWN’s Winfrey vacuum to programming the Court TV channel without courtroom shows or the Major League Baseball channel without games: “After a while, viewers stop going,” Carroll said. OWN has averaged about 136,000 viewers a day, a drop of 8 percent from what Discovery Health drew in 2010, although it’s up slightly in total viewers in prime time and has seen an 8 percent increase among women ages 25 to 54, part of the channel’s hoped-for demographic. Popular shows include “The Judds,” which ran for six episodes in April and May; “Our America With Lisa Ling”; and the reality series “Welcome to Sweetie Pie’s,” which attracted a strong African-American audience (prompting media reports that OWN intended to skew toward black viewers, an assertion that Discovery and Winfrey deny. “It doesn’t mean we’re going to turn into the `Roots’ channel,” Winfrey said, wryly.) Winfrey also is on-air with “Oprah’s Lifeclass,” which draws on her talk-show archives, and “Oprah’s Master Class,” a series of high-achiever biography specials. But, she said, she never “was supposed to carry the channel on my back, and it never was supposed to be about me being on the air as much as possible.” Instead, O magazine, with Winfrey as monthly cover girl and articles reflecting her better-life philosophy, is the intended model. She attributes the channel’s rough start to a more basic error: The lack of a “library” of programming for the many hours of airtime not filled by original shows, compounded by overconfidence about her market value in general. “I don’t understand what anybody was thinking. You’re going on the air, you’ve got four shows. What do you think you’re going to do by Tuesday? Did they think people were going to turn on the channel just because it had my name on it?” she said, sounding almost eager to cast doubt on her drawing power. “People didn’t turn on `The Oprah Winfrey Show’ because my name was on it. It was absolutely topic driven every day,” she said. Such modest expressions aside, Winfrey’s involvement clearly is key to the channel’s success. She’s glad to make the commitment, she said. As her longtime boyfriend Stedman Graham told her, she’d be bored silly today if she’d taken any lengthy break after ending her daytime show. Discovery is also in it for “the long term,” said spokesman Leavy, citing the three to five years that other cable channels have needed to develop audience-grabbing hits and firmly establish themselves. He declined to specify what Discovery has spent so far on the venture, calling media estimates high. But he pointed to long-term advertising contracts with major companies including Procter & Gamble, and hopes of new carriage fees from cable providers that have been airing the channel for free. Viewership that has been lower than expected, however, has meant “make goods” in ad time for sponsors. Winfrey, who describes herself as obsessed by ratings for the first time in her career, said she’s giving OWN “everything I’ve got. I’ve spent more energy doing this than anything I’ve ever done in my whole life.” With good reason. “I walked in today (to OWN’s offices) and felt uplifted to see my name on the door, Oprah Winfrey Network,” she said. “Just to … be able to sit in a room with a team of people presenting you with ideas – what a gift that is.” It has also made OWN her ultimate responsibility. “Every third week, someone new was in charge, and now she’s in charge. From where I sit, this is going to be her success or her failure,” said analyst Carroll. Winfrey claims to have an unlikely sounding Plan B if the channel falls short. “If this doesn’t work out, I’m going to go into organic farming in Maui. And I’m not kidding.” ___ Online: ___ EDITOR’S NOTE – Lynn Elber is a national television columnist for The Associated Press. She can be reached at lelber(at)ap.org. Follow this link: Oprah Dedicated To Turning OWN Around

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Jason Kapono on joining the Lakers

December 20, 2011
Jason Kapono on joining the Lakers

http://www.youtube.com/v/_Ml7-rO6Esk?version=3&f=user_uploads&app=youtube_gdata Jason Kapono on joining the Lakers See more here: Jason Kapono on joining the Lakers

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Chris Paul on the Clippers win against the Lakers

December 20, 2011
Chris Paul on the Clippers win against the Lakers

http://www.youtube.com/v/cWZDYxNwa0w?version=3&f=user_uploads&app=youtube_gdata Video by Melissa Rohlin Read the original here: Chris Paul on the Clippers win against the Lakers

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D&ET Jewelry 101: How To Buy Sapphires and Rubies

December 20, 2011
D&ET Jewelry 101: How To Buy Sapphires and Rubies

9.75 Carat Kashmir AGL 2010 No Heat Sapphire Two of the four precious stones, Sapphires and Rubies are closely related, both in terms of their tremendous aesthetic appeal as colored, precious gemstones, and their origin. Both Sapphires and Rubies come from the mineral corundum and are usually found in the same geographic areas when they occur naturally. They are also the hardest natural gemstone after diamonds. Sapphires and Rubies have long captivated because of their otherworldly beauty. The term, Sapphire, has a rich cultural heritage, with origins in Latin, Greek, Hebrew, old Iranian, and most notably Sanskrit, which translates into “precious to Saturn” (shanipriya). Ruby more simply hails from the Latin word Rubens, which means red. 5.19 Pigeons Blood Ruby Ring When choosing a colored gemstone such as a Sapphire or Ruby, in addition to carat, cut, and clarity, one must consider the three elements of color: hue, saturation and tone. Hue is the color of a gemstone, saturation is the vividness of the stone, and tone refers to the contrast between light and darkness in the stone. When considering a Blue Sapphire, the primary color is blue. The bluer the stone, the more valuable. Common secondary hues in a Sapphire are purple, violet and green, with purple and violet being more acceptable, and green being negative. The higher the percentage of the primary color (blue) the more valuable the stone. It requires a very skilled cutter to cut a Sapphire or Ruby exactly the right way to bring out its most favorable color. When considering a Ruby, the richer the color, the more valuable the stone. The most valuable Ruby is the pigeon blood-red. The most favorable undertone in a Ruby is violet, because it enhances the richness of the primary red color. Sapphires also come in colors other than blue (pink, orange, and beyond); however, we’ll save that for another post. To understand the value of a stone, one must also consider its origin. Although Sapphires occur naturally around the world (Australia, Africa, Thailand, Burma, Vietnam) the most prestigious and highly coveted sapphires are the Kashmir Sapphires, also known as Kashmiri Sapphires, which were discovered in Kashmir in 1880 after a landslide. Kashmir Sapphires are a pure intense blue. Other highly coveted Sapphires hail from Burma (Burmese Sapphires) and also Ceylon (now Sri Lanka). The most valuable Rubies are Burmese Rubies, which hail from Burma (now Myanmar). They can also be found in Thailand, India, Nepal and the United States. 9.32 Burma Sapphire No Heat Make sure, when selecting a Sapphire or Ruby, to ask whether it has been heat treated (which lowers its value compared to a natural gemstone). Also make sure you are purchasing a natural, rather than an artificial or synthetic, stone. Famous naturally occurring Sapphires include the 423 carat Logan Sapphire on display at the Smithsonian, the Star of Asia, a 116 carat stone on display at the American Museum of Natural History, and the St. Edward’s and the Stuart Sapphire (104 carats), which are part of the English crown jewels. Also at the Smithsonian is a 23.1 carat Burmese ruby donated by philanthropist Peter Buck and Gerard & Co’s 40.63 heart-shaped Ruby. Looking for a last minute holiday gift that will make a lasting impact? Diamond & Estate Trust has a tremendous collection of rare, high-value Blue Sapphires and Rubies, including Kashmiri Sapphires and Burmese Rubies. Contact us for a private appointment to view any of the gems in this post or to see the rest of our collection. Read more: D&ET Jewelry 101: How To Buy Sapphires and Rubies

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D&ET Jewelry 101: How To Buy Sapphires and Rubies

December 20, 2011
D&ET Jewelry 101: How To Buy Sapphires and Rubies

9.75 Carat Kashmir AGL 2010 No Heat Sapphire Two of the four precious stones, Sapphires and Rubies are closely related, both in terms of their tremendous aesthetic appeal as colored, precious gemstones, and their origin. Both Sapphires and Rubies come from the mineral corundum and are usually found in the same geographic areas when they occur naturally. They are also the hardest natural gemstone after diamonds. Sapphires and Rubies have long captivated because of their otherworldly beauty. The term, Sapphire, has a rich cultural heritage, with origins in Latin, Greek, Hebrew, old Iranian, and most notably Sanskrit, which translates into “precious to Saturn” (shanipriya). Ruby more simply hails from the Latin word Rubens, which means red. 5.19 Pigeons Blood Ruby Ring When choosing a colored gemstone such as a Sapphire or Ruby, in addition to carat, cut, and clarity, one must consider the three elements of color: hue, saturation and tone. Hue is the color of a gemstone, saturation is the vividness of the stone, and tone refers to the contrast between light and darkness in the stone. When considering a Blue Sapphire, the primary color is blue. The bluer the stone, the more valuable. Common secondary hues in a Sapphire are purple, violet and green, with purple and violet being more acceptable, and green being negative. The higher the percentage of the primary color (blue) the more valuable the stone. It requires a very skilled cutter to cut a Sapphire or Ruby exactly the right way to bring out its most favorable color. When considering a Ruby, the richer the color, the more valuable the stone. The most valuable Ruby is the pigeon blood-red. The most favorable undertone in a Ruby is violet, because it enhances the richness of the primary red color. Sapphires also come in colors other than blue (pink, orange, and beyond); however, we’ll save that for another post. To understand the value of a stone, one must also consider its origin. Although Sapphires occur naturally around the world (Australia, Africa, Thailand, Burma, Vietnam) the most prestigious and highly coveted sapphires are the Kashmir Sapphires, also known as Kashmiri Sapphires, which were discovered in Kashmir in 1880 after a landslide. Kashmir Sapphires are a pure intense blue. Other highly coveted Sapphires hail from Burma (Burmese Sapphires) and also Ceylon (now Sri Lanka). The most valuable Rubies are Burmese Rubies, which hail from Burma (now Myanmar). They can also be found in Thailand, India, Nepal and the United States. 9.32 Burma Sapphire No Heat Make sure, when selecting a Sapphire or Ruby, to ask whether it has been heat treated (which lowers its value compared to a natural gemstone). Also make sure you are purchasing a natural, rather than an artificial or synthetic, stone. Famous naturally occurring Sapphires include the 423 carat Logan Sapphire on display at the Smithsonian, the Star of Asia, a 116 carat stone on display at the American Museum of Natural History, and the St. Edward’s and the Stuart Sapphire (104 carats), which are part of the English crown jewels. Also at the Smithsonian is a 23.1 carat Burmese ruby donated by philanthropist Peter Buck and Gerard & Co’s 40.63 heart-shaped Ruby. Looking for a last minute holiday gift that will make a lasting impact? Diamond & Estate Trust has a tremendous collection of rare, high-value Blue Sapphires and Rubies, including Kashmiri Sapphires and Burmese Rubies. Contact us for a private appointment to view any of the gems in this post or to see the rest of our collection. Read more: D&ET Jewelry 101: How To Buy Sapphires and Rubies

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Raw Police Video