Posts Tagged ‘ artist ’

Novalis

April 17, 2012

“The artist belongs to his work, not the work to the artist.” Read the original post: Novalis

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Uggie, ‘The Artist’ dog, nominated for two Golden Collar Awards

February 15, 2012

JANUARY 15: Uggie the Dog from ‘The Artist’ poses in the press room at the 69th Annual Golden Globe Awards held at the Beverly Hilton Hotel on January 15, 2012 in Beverly Hills, California. See more here: Uggie, ‘The Artist’ dog, nominated for two Golden Collar Awards

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L.A.-Based Artist Mike Kelley Found Dead In His Home Of Suspected Suicide

February 2, 2012
L.A.-Based Artist Mike Kelley Found Dead In His Home Of Suspected Suicide

Los Angeles-based contemporary artist Mike Kelley was found dead in his South Pasadena home Tuesday. He was 57. His death remains under investigation, but Blouin ArtInfo says Kelley died of an “apparent suicide.” more › Go here to see the original: L.A.-Based Artist Mike Kelley Found Dead In His Home Of Suspected Suicide

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Screen Actors Guild Award Winners

January 30, 2012
Screen Actors Guild Award Winners

The SAG Awards are usually a precursor to the Oscars, so the golden statuettes presented at last night’s Screen Actors Guild Awards might show some hints on favorites at the upcoming Academy Awards in Hollywood. Earning awards at the 2012 SAG Awards were Betty White, Alec Baldwin, Jessica Lange, Steve Buscemi, Kate Winslet, Paul Giamatti, Octavia Spencer, Christopher Plummer, Viola Davis and Jean Dujardin . TV legend Mary Tyler Moore received the SAG Life Achievement Award to thunderous applause. Outstanding productions honored at the SAG Awards included “The Help,” “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows 2,” “Boardwalk Empire,” “Modern Family,” and “Game of Thrones.” The atmosphere at the Screen Actors Guild Awards was light, familiar and free of nerves because the SAG Awards are all about entertainment industry peers voting for peers. Everyone had a genuinely fun time in a room full of warm vibes. The acceptance speech by SAG Award winner Viola Davis of “The Help” was emotionally moving (video below). List of 2012 SAG Awards Winners: Cast in a Motion Picture – “The Help” Male Actor in a Leading Role – Jean Dujardin, “The Artist” Female Actor in a Leading Role – Viola Davis, “The Help” Male Actor in a Supporting Rol e – Christopher Plummer, “Beginners” Female Actor in a Supporting Role – Octavia Spencer, “The Help” Stunt Ensemble in a Motion Picture – “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows 2 ” Male Actor in a Television Movie or Miniseries – Paul Giamatti, “Too Big to Fail” Female Actor in a Television Movie or Miniseries – Kate Winslet, “Mildred Pierce” Male Actor in a Drama Series – Steve Buscemi, “Boardwalk Empire” Female Actor in a Drama Series – Jessica Lange, “American Horror Story” Male Actor in a Comedy Series – Alec Baldwin, “30 Rock” Female Actor in a Comedy Series – Betty White, “Hot In Cleveland” Ensemble in a Drama Series – “Boardwalk Empire” Ensemble in a Comedy Series – “Modern Family” Stunt Ensemble in a Television Series – “Game of Thrones” SAG Life Achievement Award – Mary Tyler Moore

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Sasha Bronner: Why I Don’t Care to Watch the Oscars This Year

January 25, 2012

Waking up yesterday morning to the sunny, glowing light of my iPhone was a little bit like waking up on Christmas morning — you sort of know what you’re gonna get, but there’s always room for surprise. Sure, there’s plenty of buzz and speculation about who might be nominated for the Academy Awards. Sure, the Golden Globes are a strange, half-broken crystal ball indicator of some of what’s to come, but you still don’t really know until you read the nomination list. I fell asleep half way through the list. It is a jumbled, confused, half-assed attempt at honoring the highest achievements in film for the year and frankly, I am bored. It’s hard to know where to even start. It’s kind of like turning in a rough draft in a freshman year creative writing class and having your bearded, vest-wearing liberal arts professor tell you to start from scratch, and with a different protagonist. I have high standards. I always have a bone or two to pick with the Academy when nominations come out. Why are we nominating good movies? Why aren’t we nominating the greatest of the great movies? We should expect good movies throughout the year. We should applaud, on the largest stage, the best ones. There are some fantastic films from 2011 that got barely a flirtatious wink from the Academy. I can barely bring myself to type the word “shame.” The irony. Shame, shame, shame. Michael Fassbender gives the performance of three lifetimes. It is a haunting, horrifyingly honest masterpiece, and one that I could not shake for months . There is no Best Actor nomination, no Best Director, Screenplay or even Supporting Actress nod for Carey Mulligan who quietly brought power and fear to her performance as Fassbender’s damaged sister. And in a completely different way, Beginners is, without a doubt, the movie that stole my heart last year. I have seen it three times, listened to the soundtrack endlessly and adored every conversation I’ve had about it. Thankfully, Christopher Plummer secured a Best Supporting Actor nomination, but Mike Mils delivered the most visceral film about love I can remember and it sticks to your skin in the best of ways, it coats your eyes when you leave the theater and everything feels different, if even for a moment, after experiencing it. It was the year of Ryan Gosling and that beautiful man got no love letter, no postcard. Drive was stylized, it was dark, it was heavy, it threw you around, it made you feel like you were and are a living, breathing human being in this world. Director Nicolas Winding Refn is a force to be reckoned with and the Academy doesn’t seem to care. I would have even taken a Carey Mulligan nomination here , just to get the film’s name on the ballot. I am happy for many films. The Artist is one I resisted and resisted seeing, hearing it was “cute” and “charming.” It is much, much more than that. I am thrilled for Bridesmaids and Moneyball and most especially for Best Actor nominee Demian Bichir for his film A Better Life . What I am not thrilled about it the insistence on nominating names instead of achievements. I love George Clooney and Alexander Payne as much as the next Westside-raised Angeleno. But I didn’t feel any sorrow, sadness or even spirit from The Descendants . I didn’t feel any magic from My Week With Marilyn . I’ve read the list over a few times. And sure, I will be happy to see some nominees win — but there’s no excitement this year, there’s no held breath or glorious moment of surprise when that-perfect-someone’s name is called and their whole world changes on screen for the rest of us to witness. Christmas morning has come and gone. I no longer believe in Santa. See the original post here: Sasha Bronner: Why I Don’t Care to Watch the Oscars This Year

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‘The Artist’ wins big at awards show

January 23, 2012

Joe Paterno, who racked up more wins than anyone else in major college football but was fired from Penn State amid a child sex abuse scandal has died. See more here: ‘The Artist’ wins big at awards show

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Drake Rips Tattoo Artist Who Wrote His Name On Fan’s Forehead

December 25, 2011

She tatted his name on her forehead, and, as promised, Drake has confirmed that he knows she is for real. He’s not 100% pleased, though. The rapper on Friday spoke out about the California woman who got his name tattooed in huge block letters across her forehead , calling her “incredible,” but the artist who did it “a f*cking asshole.” “I want to meet her and understand what happened,” he told LA radio host Mando Fresko. “That’s cool though, I feel you 100%, that to me is absolutely incredible.” As for the artist, Kevin Campbell, Drake put out a warning. “The guy who tatted is a f*cking as*hole though, I will tell you that,” he said. “I don’t f*ck with that guy. F*ck you to that tat artist by the way. And you should lose your job and should never do tattoos again and I don’t f*ck with you. And if I ever see you, I’m a f*ck you up.” For his part, the artist told Vice Magazine that he wasn’t exactly keen on doing the ink in the first place. “She was really psyched about it. She had the sh*tty font all picked out on her iPhone ready to go and was pretty adamant about putting it on her forehead,” he said. “She acted as if she had planned it out for a while, but I’m not really sure how much extended coherent thought could actually go into getting such a stupid tattoo on your forehead.” However, that mea culpa will probably get drowned out by this: “The funny thing is, I didn’t know who Drake was,” Campbell admitted. “I figured it was her hood or some shit, not some goofnugget R&B dude.” WATCH : Read the original post: Drake Rips Tattoo Artist Who Wrote His Name On Fan’s Forehead

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Tuesday Tidbit: Courtney Cox

November 1, 2011

Word recently slipped down the West Coast celebrity real estate gossip grapevine that sitcom star Courtney Cox ( Friends, Cougartown ) has added to her impressive real estate portfolio with a condo in the storied and star-stocked Sierra Towers building on the border of West Hollywood and Beverly Hills, CA. Property records show Miz Cox, separated from but still working with husband David Arquette, dropped $2,050,000 on the high floor residence in the full-service building. Records show the unit contains 2 bedrooms and 3 bathrooms in 1,672 square feet of interior space as well as a long balcony with views to the north and east. Miz Cox acquired the condo-crib from a not-famous short-term owner who, according to records we peeped, purchased the unit less than six months earlier for $1,450,000. Property records also show that just weeks after Miz Cox purchased her Sierra Towers aerie former cast mate Matthew Perry–himself on a bit of a real estate roll –dumped a 2 bedroom condo in the building he’d bought in April 2005 for $3,200,000 and sold at a huge loss in late September (2011) for $2,850,000. Some of Miz Cox’s new neighbors at Sierra Towers include a lot of high profile peeps like Cher, Elton John, Joan Collins, Diahann Carroll, and diet guru/social doyenne Nikki Haskell. Sharon and Ozzy Osbourne currently lease a unit in the building, which they had worked over by Million Dollar Decorator Martyn Lawrence Bullard , and past renters have included the likes of tabloid fixture Lindsay Lohan and stylist to the stars Rachel Zoe. In early 2007, after selling a spectacular John Lautner-designed house on Malibu’s Carbon Beach for $27,500,000 to dueling divorcees Frank and Jamie McCourt, Miz Cox (and Mister Arquette) spent $17,150,000 on a much more private bluff top compound she had worked over by architect Michael Kovac and much published nice, gay decorator Trip Haenisch . The property was featured in the July/August 2011 issue of Elle Decor magazine. In addition to their Malibu spread and a West Hollywood office building where their production company is based, Miz Cox and Mister Arquette also own two Beverly Hill residences located just a half a mile away from the Sierra Towers building. In June 2004 they spent $5,450,000 on a a sleek mid-century modern originally designed by A. Quincy Jones they they had done over by architect Cory Bruckner and in late 2008 property records show they scooped up an adjacent property for an unknown sum and unknown reasons. Back in mid-September (2011), just about the same time she was closing on her new condo at the Sierra Towers , Your Mama heard from an informant we’ll call Ivana Blowarealestatewhistle that the Cox-Arquette crib–the one with the circular swimming pool–is being readied for sale with an asking price of around $20,000,000 but that’s just celebrity real estate rumor and gossip at this point children, just rumor and gossip. Read the original: Tuesday Tidbit: Courtney Cox

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Mat Gleason: Is Pacific Standard Time Too Big to Fail?

November 1, 2011
Mat Gleason: Is Pacific Standard Time Too Big to Fail?

A friend sent me her Bank of America ATM receipt with its upbeat encouragement to explore the Pacific Standard Time website. Could there be a crueler indictment of an art world that is convinced of its moral superiority to mainstream culture than to be subsidized by one of the criminal financial forces that has brought our culture to its very knees? I was seriously considering a boycott of the entire Pacific Standard Time when I saw an entity sponsoring a cultural event after basically destroying the culture via the economy. For BofA to celebrate the very pulse that it now has contributed to killing is disgusting. But the era of the boycott seems to have vanished — instead of the boycott’s zero attention, the “occupy” era challenges power by giving perpetrators 100 percent attention. While there is a call for people to remove their money from large financial institutions on November 5 and open accounts at a local credit union, how do we as a region remove the art that defines our city and our times from the large art institutions? I suppose you don’t need an answer to begin your occupation of the art institution of your choice. And if you cannot choose one, don’t forget that the big banks collaborate with art educational institutions to profit mightily off of student loan debt. Curricula in the hallowed halls of these capitalist MFA casinos mimic the self-impressed non-engagement aesthetic as much or more than most PST exhibits. The anxiety is erased into the conceptual ether. Prozac is to art creation what the Getty is to art curation. Of course the blandest artists of the era dominate in the Getty’s sober SoCal narrative — maybe they’re also too big to fail. Instead of a critical examination about how the imbalance of American wealth was mirrored in an imbalance of a few plain-Jane artists getting a disproportionate share of the sales and attention, we get ad agency commercials. PST contents itself with insisting some trendy actor go to the museum like your mom crabbing for you go to mass on Easter Sunday—and implying that art is like Lourdes drinking water and can make local rock stars suddenly erudite. So who else wants to jump into bed with these perfect bedfellows? Bank of America is a “too-big-to-fail” institution that is under populist attack. The Getty is a “too-big-to-fail” institution that does more harm than good when it waters down an anarchic era into “gosh, golly, gee we’re so inclusive this time!” A soul searching of the artists at the top of the Pacific Standard Time food chain is much more in order than for those laggards that history forgot and who are being thrown a bone with inclusion in a little exhibit here or a solo show at a dinky institution there. Let’s hold out hope that there is a great Pacific Standard Time art exhibit awaiting us beyond these usual two suspects. PST is supposed to deliver “the era that continues to inspire the world” (said with a straight face without any reference to Hollywood) . What inspires the world? Apparently lots of text, lots of claims that other art is the only thing that influences other art. The Getty should swap places with Taschen. Every time I pick up a Taschen book, I wish I were walking through each page in some oversized museum. Every time I walk into an exhibit associated with the Getty I look out for the staples binding it together, it so resembles a walk-through term paper with occasional illustrations. But Taschen would be a blessing. Europeans actually get Los Angeles. New Yorkers are just embarrassed to be here and try to network the most of their stay to pad their job history for the inevitable move back to Queens. This expansive survey of postwar Los Angeles contemporary art is the brainchild of tired New York academics. In sports, they call this East Coast Bias. The history of the Los Angeles art scene is getting the “gee whiz” media glance that Joe Torre got when he left managing the Yankees for the Dodgers. The clucking of the blizzard and brownstone crowd goes something like this: We just can’t believe that everything does not happen in New York and that any person who matters doesn’t live in New York, but if you are going to commit suicide (the term New Yorkers use for leaving New York) you may as well enjoy exile in nice weather. Of course, stupider Angelenos are so infatuated with New York that they roll over and take whatever Big Apple expatriates are serving, not that there has been a single innovation in art in New York since Jackson Pollock (and don’t remind them that he did so on Long Island) . A gaping hole in PST is the reminder that Andy Warhol’s soup can paintings debuted in Los Angeles in 1962. But the goal of PST’s tiring parade of factotum art shows is for New York curatorial prowess to contain the greatness of Los Angeles instead of celebrating the near century of the west coast’s inarguable cultural superiority to New York. Will anyone else stand up to this cliquish coagulation of tourists showing up to tell us natives that our city matters because a few L.A. artists are so great that their names are known in New York? Like Leona Helmsley feeding filet mignon to her dog, the Getty has claimed ownership of the wildest days and nights of this town’s lore and has fed them to the least deserving: academics and advocates of the international style with no allegiance to the region. No matter how radical the artist or the artworks, the only reason not to bring children to Pacific Standard Time shows is the absolute boredom they will evince. They will point out the Emperor Getty isn’t wearing any clothes and what is dangling there on display is tiny and dull. Like Bank of America, the Getty measures greatness in the current price tag of the objects from the recent past. The more money that something you touched in 1974 is worth now, the higher up you are on the Pacific Standard Time food chain. What the Getty is really banking on is your compliance with occupying the past instead of the present to enable their control of the future. Read more: Mat Gleason: Is Pacific Standard Time Too Big to Fail?

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John Seed: Inside Eric Orr’s Zero Mass at MCASD La Jolla

October 14, 2011
John Seed: Inside Eric Orr’s Zero Mass at MCASD La Jolla

“To contemplate is to look at shadows.” — Victor Hugo In mid-August I published a blog on Huffington Post titled “When Appreciating Works of Art, Being There Is Always Best.” Composing that blog, and coming across the writings of the aesthetic theorist John Dewey, turned out to be great preparation for the visit that I made recently to La Jolla, where I took in some of the key works from “Phenomenal: California Light, Space, Surface.” “Phenomenal,” which features works that involve sensory phenomena, is an exhibition that you can’t just see; you have to experience it. John Dewey’s ringing endorsement of the essential value of experience — “There is no other foundation upon which aesthetic theory and criticism can build,” — was on my mind as I walked into the late Eric Orr’s powerful installation Zero Mass . Leah Masterson, a Communications Associate of the museum, walked in with me, and together we found ourselves in total darkness. Zero Mass , which Eric Orr (1938-1998) first created in 1969, is an oval space, defined by seamless walls of paper. Your eyes will tell you — at first — that there isn’t a hint of light to be found, and the shock is unsettling. “The apparent emptiness in which we find ourselves,” explains Dawna Sculd in the exhibition catalog, “undermines the stable sense of self that carries on unquestioned outside it.” By the time Max Metzler, one of the museum’s security staffers, entered the space, my night vision was beginning to work. Thomas McEvilley does a good job of explaining the physiology of this process in his 1982 article “Negative Presences in Secret Spaces: The Art of Eric Orr:” The transition from rod to cone vision gradually unfolds; floods of afterimage color wash over the vision and gradually decrease like waves. After about 12 minutes one is ready to see, but in a different way. Because of the gradual activation of night vision that McEvilley describes, when Max walked in to join us he appeared to me as a flat dark, featureless silhouette, with just the slightest hint of color appearing towards his feet. I also was beginning to make out a thin zone of yellowish light appearing where the paper walls touched the museum’s floor. Being joined by another person in this situation — where most of the visual clues to human identity were masked out — was intensely dramatic and rivetingly strange. “One has entered a murky Stygian world without personal identity and history,” McEvilley explains. If you haven’t experienced Zero Mass , McEvilley’s comments may sound a bit theoretical and dramatic. Having been there, I find them accurate. “A lot of people walk in for a few seconds and then just leave,” Max the shadowy security representative explained calmly. I have to admit, it makes sense that walking into a room of “nothing” could frustrate impatient museum goers. It takes a few minutes, and some sensitivity, for Orr’s installation become anything other than the darkest room you have ever been in. Metzler went on to mention that he had spent more than three hours standing in Zero Mass on opening night, and it was clear that he had become completely attuned to the installation’s unsettling effect, and quite expert on how it all worked. “If you leave for a few minutes and then come back your night vision still works,” he explained. As Metzler and I chatted a bit more I was struck by how bizarre it was to have a friendly conversation with someone who I had never “seen.” He was there in the room, and leaned on what appeared to be a cane, but was utterly flat and featureless. Using a photo I took of Max after leaving the exhibit, I was later able to approximate what I saw when he entered the room. My photoshop simulation is below, followed by the unaltered photo of Max that it was derived from. Max Metzler, MCASD security services representative, as he appeared standing inside Eric Orr’s Zero Mass ; Image created in Photoshop by the author. Max Metzler, MCASD security staff member Leaving Zero Mass after about a 10 minute visit, the natural light and ocean vistas that rim the west edge of MCASD were richer than ever before. Still, the strangeness of what I had experienced inside Orr’s work lingered. An hour later, after I had already started my car to leave, I had to race back inside and ask Max Metzler if I could take his picture. I needed something to ground my imagination a bit, as if what I had experienced just might have been a dream or hallucination. The experience of Zero Mass had opened up my visual sensitivity and my imagination. “Life itself does not belong to us,” proclaimed the artist Yves Klein in 1959, “it is with sensitivity, which does belong to us, that we are able to purchase it.” If you want to challenge your sensitivity, forget everything I have just said about Zero Mass , drive to La Jolla and walk in. It will provoke your senses, incite your imagination and open you up a bit. And don’t worry, if you feel a bit freaked out Max Metzler and other members of MCASD’s excellent security staff can talk you through it a bit, if you don’t mind chatting with Stygian shadows. “Phenomenal: California Light, Space, Surface” at MCASD La Jolla runs from Sep. 25, 2011 through Jan. 22, 2012. Read more here: John Seed: Inside Eric Orr’s Zero Mass at MCASD La Jolla

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