Posts Tagged ‘ girls ’

Kylie Richards Sells TV Pilot About Her Life

January 6, 2012

NEW YORK — Paris Hilton may have put her family’s name on the reality TV map, but her aunt Kyle Richards is hot on her tail with a new book and a TV pilot about her life. Richards’ outspoken personality served her well as a child actress growing up in Hollywood, going head-to-head with her feisty castmates on Bravo’s “The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills,” and most recently dishing out relationship, fashion and lifestyle advice in her new book, “Life Is Not a Reality Show: Keeping It Real With the Housewife Who Does It All,” published by HarperOne. In the book, Richards, who has been married for 17 years and is the mother of four girls, offers tips on everything from dealing with infidelity to how to get her signature silky locks. In a recent interview, she discussed her new projects, her sister Kim Richards’ stint in rehab and her biggest “Housewife” blowout. AP: How did you come up with the idea for your book? Richards: I grew up in a house of all women. You know, my mom, my grandmother and my sisters (Kim Richards and Kathy Hilton). … And every time they would come home, my mom would flip the light on and would say, “OK, tell me everything you did from the date, from beginning to the end.”… I used to lay there and pretend I was sleeping and listen to every little crumb – what they did wrong, what they didn’t do. … It was the best education you could ever get. And once I started the show and people saw my relationship with my husband, I got so many comments and questions on Twitter that I really thought it would be fun to talk about things that worked for me. AP: What is one of the biggest mistakes that women make in relationships? Richards: A lot people want love, but they don’t give it. I see so many of my friends with their husbands; they don’t think that they need the same attention as we do. I want my husband to feel like no one is going to love and adore him like I do. … You’d be surprised when you give that how much love you get in return. AP: Do you have any regrets about this season of “The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills”? How about your argument with castmate Brandi Glanville on Game Night? Richards: Brandi and the Game Night thing is probably my biggest regret of everything we’ve done on the “Housewives.” Even more so than the limo fight with my sister (Kim). Because in the limo with my sister, even though I got a lot of heat from that, people were angry, that’s what I was feeling … but with Game Night, that’s just not who I am, period. I was not being true to myself and to me that’s the worst thing that could happen. AP: How is Kim doing in rehab? Richards: She’s good. You know, there are rumors that she had left rehab, she did not. She’s doing really well, and I’m just really happy and proud of her for making that decision. AP: So what’s next? Richards: I just sold a pilot, a half-hour sitcom. I can’t say which network, but it’s about my life. It’s basically my life being a juggling mom, wife and being on a reality show. AP: If you don’t play yourself, which Hollywood starlet would you like to play you? Richards: I would want it to be somebody that’s really funny and could capture the humor of being a mom and all the humor that comes with being on a reality show, so maybe Jennifer Aniston or Jenny McCarthy. I don’t know, someone really funny. ___ Online: ___ Visit link: Kylie Richards Sells TV Pilot About Her Life

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Megan Fox, Josh Duhamel Go On A Far Flung Journey

January 6, 2012

We knew he was in a bind, but we had no idea Brian Grazer needed a reputable Oscar host this badly. This first trailer for the 2012 Academy Awards spoofs on the scandal-driven switch that saw Grazer swoop in to save the Oscars after original producer Brett Ratner left the show after it was reported that he made a gay slur at a screening of his film “Tower Heist.” A day after Ratner left his hand-chosen host, “Heist” star Eddie Murphy, bowed out as well , leading Ratner to tap beloved veteran host Billy Crystal for another go-round at the Kodak Theater. Megan Fox and Josh Duhamel feature in this quick clip, which sees them venture around the world in search of The Host. Look for a few surprise cameos while adventuring with the ridiculously good looking duo. WATCH : Read more from the original source: Megan Fox, Josh Duhamel Go On A Far Flung Journey

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Joe Francis: Girl Fighter Extraordinaire

January 6, 2012

Normally we would fear being sued by the lawyer-wielding stud behind the Girls Gone Wild video juggernaut for calling him “girl fighter extraordinaire.” But in this case there doesn’t seem to be any question about it. See the article here: Joe Francis: Girl Fighter Extraordinaire

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Santa Clarita Man Charged with Sexual Assault of 14 Girls

December 22, 2011
Santa Clarita Man Charged with Sexual Assault of 14 Girls

After sexually assaulting at least 14 underage girls, some as young as twelve, 19-year-old Michael Downs has been arrested and faces 29 felony charges, reports KTLA . Downs, who lives in Santa Clarita, allegedly met the girls on Facebook, and lied to them by saying he was 16. He then arranged times and places to meet them, and that’s when the attacks occurred. more › Go here to read the rest: Santa Clarita Man Charged with Sexual Assault of 14 Girls

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Harvey Weinstein: How Marilyn Monroe Got Her Groove, and How Dad Became Cool

November 26, 2011

The council of foreign relations is the nickname we have given the weekly meeting between my three very hip, very cool daughters and their very unhip, uncool dad. Once a week, school or business is torpedoed and we meet in a restaurant (I have a fourth daughter, but at 14 months she would destroy any restaurant because she has more destructive moves than Jackie Chan and is way faster). About a year ago, my mother, their grandmother, the infamous Miriam Weinstein, decided to drop by. Miriam of course, is the one we named Miramax after. By the way, when Disney kept the name Miramax, I always thought my mom was going to take on Michael Eisner. To her threats, Bob and I always said “you can’t do that” and she said, “yes I can, I’m right and he’s wrong, and that name is synonymous with a certain kind of filmmaking. And your father. And besides, if they take me into custody, I’ll get off”. Bob and I replied, “how would you get off?” “Because I know Bert Fields and David Boies”, she replied. That in a nutshell is Miriam. Lest anyone wonder where Bob and I get it from. As the conversation progressed my daughters complained about too much homework they had and how tough their teachers were. Of course I’m on their side and I tell them that I think homework is way overrated. Then, as the evening ended, Miriam asked me, “why are you making a movie about Marilyn Monroe? Hasn’t everything been said on that subject already?” Whereupon, I tell my mom that a number of years ago I had read two books by Colin Clark. Those being The Prince, the Showgirl, and Me and My Week with Marilyn ; both books about his experience making the movie when she came to London in 1956 and also detailing his fairytale romance and magical week with her. This all happened because her husband, Arthur Miller had an argument with her and left her in the middle of their honeymoon. As I progressed the story, Miriam was stunned. “I thought there were three main people in her life, the agent, what was his name?”, she continued, “oh yeah Johnny Hyde, Joe DiMaggio and Arthur Miller. Who is this Colin Clark?” I told Mom and the kids that sometimes movies are snapshots of little incidents. Actual moments in time that give you insight into a character. My daughters said dad, you made a movie like that, bringing up The King’s Speech , to which I replied, yes, a footnote with giant implications. The story of the king of England who stuttered and overcame his speech impediment. Here, I told my gang, was another snapshot. A beautiful, but mature Marilyn Monroe at age 30, allowing herself to be innocent for once swept away by a younger man. My middle daughter then said, it reminded her of Roman Holiday . Now in my house, Roman Holiday holds a special place. My daughters have always had a phobia of black and white movies. Black and white to them meant old. In fact, black and white to them meant very old, the kind of movies their dad would watch. The only thing worse than black and white to them was subtitles. So one night, I said to them that if they could make it through this old movie, I’d take them all to the mall and buy them each a gift at their favorite store. The movie was Roman Holiday . They loved the movie so much they watched it again and gave me a pass at the mall. Of course, Roman Holiday is the story of a young princess, played by Audrey Hepburn, who sneaks out the palace window and has a beautiful night in Rome alongside a dashing American reporter played by Gregory Peck. As I told my daughters the story, I explained that My Week With Marilyn has similarities to Roman Holiday . I told the girls that I have a weakness for movies about the creative process. They reminded me that Shakespeare in Love was about writing Romeo and Juliet and Finding Neverland explored how Sir James Peter Barrie wrote Peter Pan . Those were the movies they remembered of mine about the creative process. I told them that this new one was about the making of a fun, very clumsy movie, but that the way Colin Clark described making the movie gave you great insight and poked fun at the whole movie process. Sometimes, like a needle to a balloon, I said. My girls had an idea of who Marilyn Monroe was, but they certainly did not know who Sir Laurence Olivier was. Nor did they have any idea about method acting or classic acting. But I told them the clash provided a lot of comedy in the piece and that the movie had huge laughs and hopefully, if I can convince everybody, maybe a couple of fun musical numbers, too. As I went around the room, looking for a thumbs up, I saw their faces reluctant to give it to me. So I pulled out the trump card. Michelle Williams. Now my girls are lucky enough to know Michelle Williams and they know her daughter too. She is as sweet to my daughters as she is to her own. When a hair colorist had made a mistake on one of the girls, Michelle did an operation worthy of Bond, James Bond, and got it all sorted and fixed. In my house, that made her a folk hero. And that proved to be the closer. So off we went to London with Simon Curtis directing and David Parfitt producing. We assembled an all-star cast with Kenneth Branagh as Olivier and Dame Judi Dench as Dame Sybil Thorndike. We got the effervescent Emma Watson, the charming Dominic Cooper, the dashing Dougray Scott and the vivacious Julia Ormond. To play Colin Clark, we enlisted the tony award winning Eddie Redmayne. In due time, every girl on the set fell in love with. He is an actor of great vulnerability and also panache, both vital requirements to play Colin Clark. Simon Curtis wanted to immerse the film in reality so we shot it at the locations that it took place in in real life. So Windsor Castle was Windsor Castle. The Aristocratic British School for Boys was Eaton. No one ever gets to film in these locations, yet magic strings were pulled and red tape disappeared. The rumor was that somehow the royal family pulled those strings. In 1956 Marilyn Monroe met the Queen at a royal premiere. You can watch some of this footage on YouTube. They had a wonderful rapport and it was reported in all the British newspapers that they got along famously. The irony of Marilyn meeting the Queen was that they were the same age as the Queen. Imagine, Marilyn in her 80s. Pinewood Studios was where the original film The Prince and the Showgirl was made and lo and behold Simon arranges for Michelle Williams to have Marilyn Monroe’s dressing room. In the film there is a magic moment when Marilyn Monroe comes down to greet the company of players who are making this film. When the door opened to Marilyn/Michelle’s dressing room and she came out in a beautiful gown, something very similar to what Marilyn wore, and greeted Kenneth, Toby, Derek, Judi, Dougray, Julia and Eddie, you could hear a pin drop. The applause that you hear in the movie for Marilyn’s entrance was just as real for Michelle’s entrance as Marilyn. Everyday Michelle performed alchemy to transform into Monroe. Her use of makeup was as splendid as it was detailed. She practiced the voice, the walk, the wiggle, the waddle, the signing and the dancing. For anybody who loves movies, this is a movie about making movies. We see Colin Clark start to work his way from a lowly third assistant director to finally becoming Laurence Oliver’s right hand man on set (later on in life, Clark became a key executive at Olivier’s production company and finally a great documentary filmmaker, producer, writer, director and author). He witnesses Marilyn’s fateful argument when Arthur Miller writes in his journal that it is impossible to live with Monroe after only 30 days of marriage. That the paparazzi had rendered him soulless. They fight, she ends up alone. Colin then tells Marilyn the truth about herself. Through the relationship of making the movie, they become friends and eventually become romantic. All the comedy that Simon intended to be in the film is there. Watching Kenneth Branagh and Michelle Williams dual of wits is bloody entertaining. Nothing is more satisfying to me than watching an audience reaction to a movie. We screened the final cut of Marilyn to Michelle in Detroit where she was shooting Sam Raimi’s Oz when a packed theater erupted into huge laughter, but the best sight was watching Michelle’s laughter too. The finished movie was rated R. A problem for an 8-year-old, a 13-year-old and a 16-year-old. But I decided to take them to the New York Film Festival with their grandmother where My Week With Marilyn was the centerpiece and the film had its official premiere. It had been one year since that dinner at Cipriani when I got the green light to get involved in the film. So there I was, presenting an R-rated movie to my daughters. Much less their grandmother who tends to get rather conservative over things like that. When the lights went down, the magic began and I could hear the laughter and cheers from my girls. Even though they didn’t really know who Marilyn Monroe or Laurence Olivier where, they too were laughing at those jokes. The older one whispered Roman Holiday and that from watching this movie she thought that Michelle Williams was a modern day Audrey Hepburn. Miriam, in her true parlance (even though she’d been told the story ten times), said she had no idea that Marilyn Monroe fell in love with a 23-year-old boy. Then grandma said to her daughters, “you should not be seeing an R-rated movie, you could get in trouble for that”. To this I responded, “don’t worry Mom, I know Bert Fields and David Boies too.” As we filed out of the theater, the girls started talking about Marilyn Monroe saying she was a strong independent woman. They said she was smart, funny and determined. They said she had a kind streak in her. That she was misunderstood and that they could feel her warmth. They said that in the 1950s, when women were just going along with the status quo, she stood out. That she was rebellious, but had a sense of humor about it and was thus very effective. And then finally, the corker. They said Marilyn Monroe was cool and that as a result, I was kind of cool for making the movie. The epilogue to the story, is that two weeks ago, Katy Perry saw the film and tweeted about how much she liked it. When I told my girls she wanted to meet me they said, “you’re not cool enough to meet Katy Perry,” and that they should go in my place. As a father of four daughters, I’ve learned that COOL is a gift that only comes occasionally, but for a short time, Marilyn Monroe made dad cool. Read the rest here: Harvey Weinstein: How Marilyn Monroe Got Her Groove, and How Dad Became Cool

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Sacramento Earthquake Shocker

October 27, 2011

The Sacramento earthquake rocked the California State Capitol as the midnight hour approached, leaving startled Northern Californians to wonder if the quake was The Big One. The 5.2 magnitude earthquake shook the state capitol building and rattled the California Legislature and State Assembly offices in the dead of night. The earthquake epicenter was 23 miles outside of Truckee, CA and was felt in Sacramento, Oakland and San Francisco. The USGS reports at least five aftershocks following the temblor, and local nerves are on-edge.

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Blackbeard’s Cannon Raised from N.C. Shipwreck

October 27, 2011
Blackbeard’s Cannon Raised from N.C. Shipwreck

History’s most infamous pirate scuttled the ship in 1718. Photo Credit: AP Continue reading here: Blackbeard’s Cannon Raised from N.C. Shipwreck

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Georgia Van Cuylenburg: How I Coped With Losing All Of My Hair — At 21

October 27, 2011

Most little girls have a very special connection to their hair. When I was growing up in Australa, I was always trying to make it the best hair it could be, and sometimes I got it a little wrong. The day before the first grade photo I decided I didn’t want bangs, so I took the scissors to them. In fifth grade I shaved my eyebrows off and told my Mother they fell out. And in 6th grade I decided an under-cut was a good idea … wrong!! By the time I was 16, my hair was down to the small of my back, and my natural golden highlights were the envy of all the girls in my class. Body image issues plagued me in high school, but the one thing I loved about my appearance was my hair. When I was 18 I got asked to be a hair model by a famous hair salon, and my hair became even more the thing that I identified as ME. I was now officially “the girl with the great hair.” Three years later, my “great hair” and I were working in L.A. I told jokes, did TV and film, often on shows for children , helping them believe in their own ‘magic.’ I loved my new life. Then one typical Wednesday, as I stood in the shower, I watched as hundreds of my ‘great hairs’ washed down my body. As I rubbed the shampoo through my hair, clumps fell out in my hands. I was too scared to get out of the shower because I didn’t know what I would see in the mirror. When I finally did look at myself I could see spots of bare scalp peering through my hair. As I brushed and brushed I watched my clear white sink fill up with hair. I remember seeing myself in the mirror and holding back the tears. That day my life changed forever. I told myself that there must be a reason why this was happening. I shouldn’t waste my time feeling sorry for myself, I should just find out why. Over the next year I put myself through dose after dose of steroid and cortisone injections. I had the most horrific form of acupuncture imaginable. I ate every food, supplement and vitamin that you find when you Google ‘hair loss.’ But all the doctors I had visited were right: I had Alopecia Areata, an autoimmune disease where the body rejects its hair. There is no cure. That first year I hid my Alopecia Areata. The few people who knew insisted that I should keep it a secret because no one would hire me. I wore a terrible wig that looked and felt like straw. It was so bad that I always wore a hat. (Believe me, a Californian summer spent in a wig and hat, on top of an ointment that creates constant ‘sunburn’ on your head, is a very painful and sweaty affair.) I couldn’t work in front of the camera because I couldn’t take my hat off. I wouldn’t let men get too near because I couldn’t work out how to explain why, no matter how many items of clothing came off, the hat had to stay on. That was probably the toughest year of my life. I knew something had to change. I had lost so much of myself. I was no longer the girl with the great hair, and lying all the time was exhausting. I have never been one to avoid the truth. My work involved encouraging children to love themselves … just as they were. Yet here I was hiding who I really was. It was that realization that changed everything for me. I decided to stop seeing my Alopecia Areata as a burden, but rather as an amazing gift. I had always wanted children to feel that I really understood when they spoke about being different or alone. And now I had a big ‘signpost’ on my head that said “I GET IT!!!” I started sharing my story with children, and I could feel an amazing change in the way they responded to me. When I started working on a documentary about the experience, kids and adults from all around the world emailed me and shared their stories. It wasn’t just Alopecians; people with all sorts of ‘secrets’ started confiding in me. Almost everyone I met had a secret to share with me. Because I was standing before them saying, “this is me,” they felt they could do the same. And very slowly, I learned to trust I was good enough as I was, that it was the essential me that people -responded to — with or without hair. Not every moment of honesty has been joyful. Dating in particular has been rough. I now tell every guy on the first date. I don’t want to go a second date with someone who sees me only as ‘the girl with no hair.’ I’d rather wait for a man who can see the strong person I have become because I have no hair. Alopecia Areata has become my Man Meter. Over the last three years my hair has come and gone. Sometimes I have it and sometimes I don’t. I now have a cabinet full of wigs, but most days I prefer just to wear the hair I have. I am very excited about the progress being made towards a cure for Alopecia Areata, and I hope one day it is found. But I can’t say that I wish I never had it because of what it has brought to my life. Without my Alopecia Areata, I never would have seen the difference that being honest about yourself can make in the lives of others. I never would have met so many truly beautiful people and through them learned that I am beautiful, too. I never would have really believed that something I thought was a tragedy could fill my life with purpose. Today I have about three quarters of my hair. I don’t have any bangs because half an inch is missing at the front. I also don’t have any eyebrows. All the hair is missing at the back too, so I once again have a fierce ‘under-cut’ … and this time I’m okay with it. WATCH: Read the original: Georgia Van Cuylenburg: How I Coped With Losing All Of My Hair — At 21

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Exclusive: Ronnie Ortiz-Magro Did Cheat On Sammi Giancola

October 21, 2011

Beverly Hills, CA October 18, 2011 – Jersey Shore ‘s Ronnie Ortiz-Magro cheats on Sammi Giancola and this time it is with Reality TV star Morgan Osman from Bad Girls Club Miami! The two were seen all over Sunny Isles, FL. Read more here: Exclusive: Ronnie Ortiz-Magro Did Cheat On Sammi Giancola

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Melissa Knoll – A Life Lived Fully but Wisely

May 26, 2010
Melissa Knoll – A Life Lived Fully but Wisely

Greg Knoll was 38 when he died of a rare form of stomach cancer. Fortunately for his wife, Melissa, the life insurance he owned through work and on his own paid off debts accumulated during the illness, funded college savings for the two daughters, and has enabled Melissa and the girls to stay in the family home.

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Raw Police Video